04 September 2018 Posted By : Edited by John Stokes

Buyer Beware of Supermarkets Selling Fake Organic Produce



 

More and more people these days are trying to be more healthy.

That's fabulous.  But, unfortunately, may capitalists have sought to take advantage of more health-conscious buyers who seek organic produce.

Many people who see the label "organic" will just assume that the fruit or vegetable with the organic-label is free of potentially harmful chemical agents.

But this is not the case.

Here's my story which illustrates what I am about to tell you.

So, I am at the local Sobeys and decide to buy some organic blueberries.

I took them home, and washed it they way I usually do.

But the next day I woke up with for lack of a better phrase a "blueberry hangover".

This is a dead giveaway that these blueberries weren't organic.

Truly organic produce, notwithstanding, perhaps, differences in light, will always taste better with a fuller flavour and make you feel better -- unless you have developed a sudden allergic reaction to a fruit or vegetable.

If you eat a so-called "organic" fruit or vegetable and it tastes not-as-good; or it has a bit of an aftertaste you're not sure where it came from or it makes you feel not as good as the "conventionally grown" produce, there's a good chance you have been tricked!  Organic product is SUPPOSED to taste better because it doesn't have all those chemicals / pesticides to distract from the true produce's flavour.

And here's the trick you need to watch out for.

Legally, the 'organic' in organic produce just refers to how it was grown.

But it doesn't mean that the dishonest capitalist after they picked your produce didn't dump a bunch of chemicals onto your produce AFTER they picked it to ensure none of them would get any mould.

Four companies I have trusted the most with a responsible use of the organic label are Driscol, Rainer, Mike's at Metro and Loblaws 'organic' produce.

This gets back to my Sobey's "organic" blueberry story.

So, I decided to keep my blueberries in the fridge to see how long it would take for them to get mould.  The Driscolls organic blueberries can take just two, three or four days tops to get mould.  But so far I have kept three packets that I refused to eat of these rather generic labelled 'organic' blueberries from Sobeys, and would you know it after about four weeks no one mould on these blueberries!

Now, how many chemicals were dumped on these perfectly preserved blueberries after they were picked?  Buyer beware of those companies not on my list.

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